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Geographical Indications in Nepal: In Search of Indentity




In the multilateral trading system, geographical indications (GIs) are much debated. The division about the role of GIs among the developed countries has furthered controversy. Developing and least-developed countries (LDCs) perceive GIs through the lens of sustainable development. Nepal’s economy is predominantly based on agricultural products, but local actors are not able to market products globally. GIs may provide a unique opportunity for the farmers and small-scale producers to promote local heritage globally. Moreover, considering the geo-climatic condition, GIs may represent an excellent opportunity for Nepal. This chapter analyses GIs development in international law and focuses on potential GIs in Nepal. In order to do so, it discusses the rural development potential of Gisin the context of an overview of intellectual property protection in Nepal and the international rules. The chapter concludes with a discussion of GIs prospects in Nepal, and particularly a case study of Nepalese tea.


Pratyush Nath Upreti, 'Geographical Indications in Nepal: In Search of Identity' in Susy Frankel (ed.) Is Intellectual Property Pluralism Functional? ( Cheltenham/UK Edward Elgar Publishing 2019) 235-266.


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